The Golden Age of Childhood 

There was a blog post I read about a mom crying in the Lego aisle because her kids were no longer babies, toddlers, or preschoolers. Poignant but I can’t say I mourn a minute of that time. I don’t wax nostalgic or weep for one second the infant and preschool years.

I think I whooped a “Hallelujah” the second I put my kindergarten daughter on the bus. 

I’ll mourn next fall when my son rides the junior high bus, and my daughter graduates to the “big kids” elementary school. No little ones at the K-2 school.

I’ll mourn the day when I no longer have any grade schoolers. I’ll mourn when Little Miss puts away dolls Young Man his army men.

My kids are 7 & 11. My dad says it’s the age he most enjoyed my sister and me. Grade school is the golden age of childhood. They read real books. Enjoy history and science. They play independently and creatively. They get dressed, feed themselves, and buckle up in the car. But Dad and Mom are still the center of their world.

One day they’ll buy their clothes, eat out with their friends, and have driven themselves. I love teens and know I’ll enjoy that age too. But I will miss the Easy Bake and Lego years.

This year my eyes will be dry as I shop for Monster High and Star Wars toys. But in a few years, I will be that weepy mess of a mom in American Eagle remembering the first time my little girl wore size 5. She wore them that day she confidently boarded the bus in front of her dry-eyed mom.

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4 thoughts on “The Golden Age of Childhood 

  1. Like you, I don’t miss the diaper days at all and I loved the moment sleeping in became feasible again. Mine will be turning 12 next month and starting middle school next year. I treasure that she still loves hugs and kisses and cuddling on the couch while watching tv.

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  2. Ah, I can see how young you are yet! You never mentioned the college/empty nest years. That’s when I lost it. Two left home for out of state.
    So I wouldn’t be a soggy mess the day we dropped them off, I made sure to find a quiet hour on several occasions during the summer to sit in their bedrooms and grieve the end of the final season of childhood. When the last kid left for a college less than an hour away, I still sobbed all the way home.
    And then we returned to an empty house. My husband raised his eyebrows and gave me that endearing smile. I grinned back. The empty nest season has many advantages….

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    • You’re right, I didn’t think about the empty nest years. I think that will be hard, especially if my kids go far away.
      I suspect there will be good times with just my husband and me. We had five years of marriage before our son was born, so we know how to enjoy each other.

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