There’s Another World Out There

Vintage reads

Women’s rights. Poverty. Art. Non-western culture. Microfinance.

All the above topics can be found in a book written for girls ages eight to ten. “Sounds ambitious,” you might comment. Yes, and Mitali Perkins meets those ambitions with great success. I can’t call it a “Vintage Read.” It’s only going on ten years old, but I thought I’d let the teacher in me come out for today’s topic. Mitali Perkins

Rickshaw_Girl

Rickshaw Girl is set in Bangladesh in modern times. Naima is around ten years old, the daughter of a rickshaw driver. She is forced to leave school since her parents can’t pay fees for more than one child. Now, it’s her younger sister’s turn. Naima has tremendous artistic talent, but what good is that? As a female, she never expects to get a job much less be able to use her talent.

From that premise, Naima gets herself into a few scrapes as she bungles her efforts to contribute to family finances. From facing down the prejudice of boys her own age to learning about the possibilities of borrowing from a “bank” for women who want to start a business, Perkins teaches these concepts with a vocabulary that young readers can understand. Central to Naima’s story is her talent for creating alpanas, beautiful geometrical and floral designs painted in rich colors.

Alpana design. Photo by Sanjay K Ram (2007) on Flickr

Alpana design. Photo by Sanjay K Ram (2007) on Flickr

Rickshaw Girl may be better introduced through assigned reading in schools or homeschools.  My granddaughter, who devours all books on fantasy and princesses, didn’t show much interest when I showed her the cover of Rickshaw Girl.

However, just as we don’t feed our children entire meals of rich desserts, we should add more than one genre to their reading diet. I insisted that my children eat their meat and vegetables, and when I next see my granddaughter, we’re going to read this book together. Who knows? Rickshaw Girl may spark Hannah’s interest in other cultures, leading her to missions work or philanthropic projects for those in need.

Microfinance Women photo credit to athiqahnuralami.wordpress.com

Microfinance Women photo credit to athiqahnuralami.wordpress.com

When I was a child, I didn’t like books written in diary form. Still don’t, as a general rule, but if someone hadn’t forced me to read a journal written during World War II by some girl in Holland, I might never have discovered my passion for Holocaust history.

A free copy of Rickshaw Girl to the first person who tells me the identity of that girl in Holland.

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10 thoughts on “There’s Another World Out There

  1. Anne Frank! I’ve taught The Diary of Anne Frank many times with middle school students, and I have Bamboo People by Mitali Perkins in my classroom library already, so I’d love to add this one!

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  2. Thanks for sharing this. I haven’t read it and will make the effort to. I will also pass this on to those teaching YA and children’s lit classes at the University.

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  3. I read *everything* as a child – my preferences for SpecFic didn’t really start to take over until I was in my mid/late teens. I agree that a literary diet needs to be varied – it helps make one well-rounded. Though I’ll admit I never read Anne Frank. I read about her in the encyclopedia and that was enough for me…

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  4. I love reading about other cultures. It’s almost like reading fantasy. 🙂 Sort of a healthy dessert. 😀

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  5. A girl in a foreign land, creating art and making money? I would’ve enjoyed that story.

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  6. Pingback: Mr. Popper's Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater | Scriblerians

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